It’s time for “Real Talk”

Institutional racism, racial profiling, classism, gender and sexual orientation discrimination, colorism- these are  all constructed, yet irrefutable and substantive social issues that continue to follow us, from one generation to the next, with no apparent resolution or end in sight. And the thing is, not many people are willing to really talk about them. And when …

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The state of America today as I see it

So it's no secret that as a country, we Americans tend to comfortably reside in a perpetual state of denial as to the true state of the world we live in. As a country, we don't learn from the past, we choose to not heed the wisdom of those who have fought against oppression, enslavement, …

Can we change racial inequity in this country?

'Do I believe we can change racial inequity?' This question was posed during a Race Power, Privilege Workshop: Tools and Strategies for Advancing Racial Equity training I attended last week. Everyone who attended worked in an organization or city/county department that provides services to the community in some form or fashion. Now, I personally don't believe …

This is how America treats our Black Revolutionary Leaders; We cannot forget about Mumia Abu-Jamal!!

At one time, the "Free Mumia" campaign had momentum and there were many folks who believed in his innocence and worked tirelessly to get the message out to the masses about the injustice that had been done to him. But here we are, in 2015 and I wonder how many people have forgotten about Mumia …

Why are black women still considered less physically attractive than other women??

I watched part of an episode of a tv show called "Being Mary Jane" the other day and in this episode she convened a panel of guests (she hosts a talk show) to discuss an article that is actually a real life article written by Dr. Satoshi Kanazawa and was published by Psychology Today back …

Did you know there used to be a “Black Wallstreet”?

I recently discovered a piece of history that has conveniently been left out of our history books. On June 1,1921 one of the most affluent Black communities in northern Tulsa, Oklahoma was destroyed. The community stretched across 36 blocks, encompassed over 600 businesses and had a population of 15,000 Black folks. From what I've read about that community, …